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Ethical Problems in the Field of Positive Psychology - Essay Example

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Author : elinore77

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This research is being carried out to evaluate and present ethical problems in the field of positive psychology. The subject of ethics and the dynamics involved in its violation is often seen from the perspective of Aristotle’s ethical theory…

Extract of sample
Ethical Problems in the Field of Positive Psychology

This essay will begin with the description of the deception in positive psychology. Whether it is positive or social, psychological research may not be as easy as it seems due to various rules of experimentation, which researchers need to make sure the study abides by. Psychological researches have an ethical code that contributes in enhancing or diminishing the validity and reliability of its findings. Ethical guidelines are an essential factor in a research and a violation usually turns out to be extremely detrimental not only to the researcher but can have debilitating repercussions on the study subjects as well. Moreover, it raises questions regarding the experimenter’s credibility and jeopardizes his or her reputation as a professional. Informed consent, legality, honesty, integrity and protection of human subjects are some of the ethics that a study needs to incorporate to validate the findings. Out of all the aforementioned issues, deception of human participants have been the most frequent and controversial ethical breach in psychological research. For a study to progress smoothly, attainment of free and informed consent of the participant is essential before the clinician puts them through an experimental procedure. However, in certain circumstances, psychologists withhold information or misinform the study subjects in order to increase their compliance to the experimenter’s demands and their willingness to participate in the study. ...
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