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Palestinian perspective: justice and peace - Essay Example

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Number: Palestinian Perspective: Justice and Peace The Palestinian state has been recognized by over 100 nations, its legitimacy still in question by rest of the world. Israel, with the help of the US federal government, has for long engaged in a campaign to obstruct and thwart Palestine’s aim of winning the recognition of international community as an independent state…

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Palestinian perspective: justice and peace

Palestinian authorities are under pressure to secure its legitimacy as a state, even as they strive to ensure that the widely unrecognized state keeps its part of the agreement it made with the Israeli government. However, the Palestinians are in fear that such a step will only lead to the legitimization of a disjointed territory, displaced community with no statehood. In trying to gain global recognition as a state, the Palestinians have rejected the idea of engaging in a war with the Zionists and Hashemites. However, this has not stopped the Israelites from sabotaging any attempts for a Palestinians to achieve their long desired dream. This is because the Zionist have always believe that there is no legitimacy to the Palestinians in Gaza, not unless the natives (Palestinians) are denied statehood. Close to 85% of Palestinians believe that violence such as those meted upon Israel by Hamas achieves better results than negotiations (Unt.edu par 3). The Palestinians also wish to see Israel recognize the rights of its refugees to return to their original homes. Different groups some from the Muslim world and others from the West have argued that Islam and democracy cannot go together. The West claims that Islam is anti-democracy and authoritarian. ...
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