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The Woman at the Tomb - Essay Example

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College
Author : sdaniel
Essay
Religion and Theology
Pages 4 (1004 words)

Summary

The Women at the Tomb The Gospel accounts of the women in the Gospels are means of access about the Easter message. Specifically, the story of the women sighting the empty tomb is part and parcel of what we could term as resurrection narratives. It is a piece of a series of events, often called appearances after the death and burial of Jesus…

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The Woman at the Tomb

The faith in Jesus’ resurrection plays a central feature in the Christian tradition. In such case, there is the need to investigate the origin and meaning of the belief in Jesus’ resurrection. The oldest text in the New Testament that says something about the resurrection can be found in the first letter of Paul to the Christian community in Corinth that was written around the year 56 C.E. The passage reminds the Corinthians of the proclamation of Paul regarding the resurrection of Jesus. Such reminder by Paul also indicates how early the resurrection belief was. The text starts with “I handed on to you as of first importance what I in turn had received” (1 Cor. 15:3). This indicates that what follows is not purely Paul’s composition. Paul quoted a very old creedal statement. There are many theories behind regarding how Paul might have received this basic Christian proclamation. Some scholars say that he received the main formula at Damascus when he went there upon being converted to Christianity about 36 C.E. Others would state that Paul got all or some of this material from his first visit to the Christian community of Jerusalem in 39 C.E. The formula from which Paul quotes contains two important elements about the resurrection: he was raised and he appeared (Loewe 101). ...
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