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The Schiavo : Ethics and the End of Life : What have you Learned from this Dilemma? - Case Study Example

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Case Study: The Schiavo Case: Ethics and the End of Life: What Have You Learned From this Dilemma? While ethics is an area of investigation that dates back to at least ancient Greek philosophy, it is also a discipline that must be continually re-examined and considered in light of cultural and technological changes…

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The Schiavo : Ethics and the End of Life : What have you Learned from this Dilemma?

Recently, one such ethical consideration presented itself in the life of the family members of Terri Schiavo. Schiavo is an individual that had lost higher brain functions and had been relegated to a bed and a feeding tube. Schiavo’s parents desire was to keep her alive, while her husband believed it was Schiavo’s desire to remove the feeding tube. The incident presents a number of ethical questions related to end of life issues. This essay considers the various issues surrounding this case, and articulates what I learned from this dilemma. In considering the various ethical elements surrounding the Terri Schiavo dilemma there are a number of things I learned. One of the primary elements I learned to consider was the nature of ethical considerations in the realm of secular and non-secular concerns. Within the spectrum of the Terri Schiavo dilemma it seems apparent that one of the primary concerns arises as an element of Schiavo’s parents Roman Catholic beliefs. The ethical dilemma is presented as a concern between her family members over medical concerns, with Schiavo’s parents indicating that they believe she has the potential to wake from her state and her husband indicating not believing this is possible. Still, it seems that most evidence indicates that Schiavo has truly lost higher-level brain functioning. ...
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