Informal Objective Summaries Ethics, the Cold War, Vietnam - Essay Example

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Informal Objective Summaries Ethics, the Cold War, Vietnam

He asserts that Christians should pray and have faith and hope of winning. He goes further to explain that this is because we are the cause of war. He claims that it is the hatred in our own selves that makes us to fight. We fight because our hatred is so big that we cannot note, but see the little hatred in others. We use others as scapegoats and invest all our evil in them and, therefore, think that once we fight these scapegoats we will be liberated. However, deep in the article, Morton gets into the social cultural perspective and condemns the society for its failures in protecting those who had good intentions for the society. He says that the society instead criticizes them for their failures in some cases blaming them for the happenings. He says the power of God can be the solution since as much as we do not trust in one another we all trust in Gods being and we should not condemn but love all carefully (Merton, 1962). Roy Arundhat argues from social/ cultural perspective. “Drinking wine and preaching water”, a phrase commonly used to refer to hypocritical acts, is what Arundhat Roy indirectly meant by saying girls are boys and boys are girls in reference to America particularly the war with Iraq and the Taliban terrorists. ...
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Informal Objective Summaries; Ethics, the Cold War, Vietnam Name: Institution: Informal Objective Summaries; Ethics, the Cold War, Vietnam Thomas Merton takes more of a theological perspective than social/cultural in the excerpt from “The Power of Nonviolence”…
Author : jdubuque

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