Wireless technology

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This paper defines VoIP, explores the better known available wireless technologies, and explains the advantages and disadvantages of each technology in delivering this new service.


Many of these features are migrating to consumer customers. For example, most consumer videoconferencing technology uses the same SIP protocol used by VoIP.
One difficulty will always remain in such solutions: VoIP is only as reliable as your broadband connection. If there is a power outage or a dropped connection the VoIP is lost. For most users then a contingency plan will be required if they are using any of the above schema.
The configurations presented above assume that the user will be in reach of a landline or a computer. Yet in the same way that people have discarded their landlines in favour of cellular telephones, it is envisaged that people will want to retain the freedom of a cellular, but at lower VoIP call rates. What's really required by the WiFi generation is a 'roaming' solution that has the convenience of WiFi, the coverage of a cellular network with a Bluetooth 'hands-off' package.
Bluetooth is a low-cost wireless communications technology that links devices such as mobile phones, laptop and printers to a short-range wireless, personal area network. Bluetooth technology operates on 2.4GHz, the same bandwidth as WiFi. Bluetooth wireless can transmit data up to a rate of 1 Mbps, or 2 Mbps in the second generation of the technology. ...
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