George Emerson as a Symbol or a Human Being

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Pages 8 (2008 words)
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In the first version of the novel, George was an aesthetic prig; in the 'New Lucy' he was an ideal figure, a compound of noble peasant and Cambridge culture, killed off by his creator when he rode his bicycle into a tree in a storm; while in A Room with a View, he is a complex but negative figure, an imperfect product of his father's system of natural education, too passive to justify his final claim to Lucytoo weak to sustain his symbolic role as the embodiment of naturalism"


This paper would endeavor to show that the role played by George in the transformation of Lucy (which is the novel's central action) is rather passive and mostly have a symbolic bent; that the actual active agents of Lucy's transformation lie elsewhere and is distribute evenly among various other agencies; and that the symbolism that George is endowed with by the author stands in the way of his realization as a living breathing human being.
To begin with, throughout the novel, we find Mr. Emerson (George's father) functioning as the mouthpiece for his son. Thus the words and the initiatives that should have come from George for him to become a truly dynamic character and a justifiable symbol of the 'naturalism' that Forster upholds, comes not from him but from the mouth of Mr. Emerson. The original offer of 'a room with a view' that begins the novels dramatic as well as the symbolic action, for instance, is tendered towards Lucy Honeychurch and her elderly chaperone Miss Bartlett, not by George, but by Mr. Emerson. ...
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