Aristotle's argument that women are subsidiary to men

Aristotle
Undergraduate
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Philosophy
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Name Instructor Course Date Aristotle's Argument In the ancient world, it was a common belief that men and women were created in different ways so that they could fulfil the diverse needs of their societies. While this may have been the case, many ancient scholars had varying opinions concerning the differences between these sexes, and among the most outspoken in this subject was Aristotle…

Introduction

Aristotle, despite his appreciation of some attributes of women, including their intelligence, he was of the opinion that that they were subsidiary to men and because of this they had to submit themselves to men in their lives since women are “more mischievous, less simple, more impulsive... more compassionate” (Aristotle 28). Aristotle justified his opinion by actively supporting those laws that denied women the right to own property, and if they got married, with the said property it should be transferred to their husbands on such an occasion. Considering that he also believed that women had to stay only in female quarters of the household, except during extreme need, shows his belief that women had to be contained, which in essence was similar to enslaving them. Aristotle was an extremely prominent scholar of the ancient world and he had a lot to say concerning women and their subservience to men. While his writings seem to indicate that he was exceedingly liberal about the roles of the various sexes in many aspects of life, it is a fact that he was a believer in the inferiority of women to men (Francis 144). ...
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