Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!

John Stuart Mill's principle of liberty - Essay Example

Only on StudentShare
Author : legrosadelia

Summary

Today our society is preoccupied with notions of democracy, liberty, and observance of human rights, which we may tend to view as symbols of modernity. But many of us forget that modern Western societies rest on the heritage of thinkers who during several centuries had been laying the ground for modern democratic institutions and practices.1 In this regard, one of the important historical figures involved into perhaps the most thorough defence of principles of liberalism was John Stuart Mill (1806-1873), the British philosopher and economist thought to be among the most influential philosophers of the nineteenth century.2 In his treatise "On Liberty" Mill offered a principle of liberty which …

Extract of sample
John Stuart Mill's principle of liberty

I prefer this definition of public policy because it establishes a direct connection between expectations of a society and the effectiveness of their embodiment by governments. With such observations in mind, let us try to find out to what extent, if at all, John Stuart Mill's principle of liberty is a workable and attractive basis for public policy in light of real-life challenges. ...
Download paper

Related Essays

John Stuart Mill: Utilitarianism and Pleasure.
Utilitarianism as a guide to personal behavior can relate to both personal experiences of happiness or pleasure as a guide to conduct and a recognition of the greater good of society as a higher motivation for service. Consequently, the basis for moral action is described in Utilitarianism for both the individual and society. Utilitarianism, as posited by Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) and John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) historically, has been criticized as being a “doctrine worthy only of swine,” because critics concluded that using pleasure or personal happiness as a criteria for universal…
5 pages (1255 words)
John Stuart Mill's view of the Iraqi War, according to his book "On Liberty"
The answer to both of these questions is negative, for sure. It is more interesting to discuss ethical and moral principles of war in the modern context from the perspective of Utilitarianism. One of the greatest utilitarian philosophers is John Stuart Mill and his main positions from his philosophical work “On Liberty” are further on applied for the discussion about war in Iraq. In this book one of the greatest utilitarian philosophers underlines the importance of liberty and freedom of thinking for every individual. At the same time, he claims that people should be willing to have…
10 pages (2510 words)
John Stuart Mill Utilitarianism
He argues that the principle of utility should be seen as a tool for promoting general happiness. Most of our actions, according to him, should be judged according to this principle. In his illustration of the utility theory, Mill thinks that we should appeal to the principle of utility only when we face a moral dilemma between two secondary principles. The basic assumption of the utilitarian theory, as advocated by Mill, is that "we should each act so as to promote the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people." These important ethical views of Mill can be applied in almost all…
3 pages (753 words)
John Stuart Mill's Ulitilarianism
Liberal feminism as propounded by Mill appears to conflict with some of the ideas advocated by utilitarianism; however, once thoroughly considered it does harmonise with his theory of utilitarianism.…
6 pages (1506 words)
Comparing both Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill's philosophical positions
He believed that happiness is derived from the good will in performing an action regardless of the consequences. Consequently, the results of an action, whether good or bad, should be deemed irrelevant so long as the basis of good action was based on good will. Furthermore, he believed that people actions were morally good when based on an obligation to duty. According to Kant, if a maxim was in compliance to universal law then it was morally good and could be subjected to rational human beings (Maj, 2002). Kant further specified the practical imperative which dictated on human dignity. The…
2 pages (502 words)