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Socrates - The Greatest Philosopher Of All Time. - Research Paper Example

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College
Research Paper
Philosophy
Pages 7 (1757 words)

Summary

“The unexamined life is worth nothing” said Socrates and he proved it when he ended his life by drinking a cup of hemlock (Brainy quotes, 2011). Widely regarded as the greatest philosopher of all time Socrates did not leave behind any literary works of his own…

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Socrates - The Greatest Philosopher Of All Time.

Such was his influence on the philosophical world that the era before him has been named the pre Socrates era. Socrates set the standard for all the western philosophers to come. His methods were employed by all the great philosophers later including Plato and Aristotle to name a few which makes a case in itself for him being the greatest. A thorough analysis of his life, teachings and philosophical viewpoints will further establish my claim for him being the greatest philosopher of all time. Life Born to Sophroniscus a sculptor by profession in 469 BC, Socrates was both short and unattractive (socrates a closer look at the greatest thinker). Though little is known about his early life it is reported that he was educated in literature, music, gymnastic and sculpture which were the integral constituents of elementary education at that time in Athens. Socrates had many teachers. Socrates mentioned that he was taught “love” by diotima of mintineia. Socrates also mentioned that he learned rhetoric from Aspasia and music from Connus. However, others argue that his principal teacher was Anaxagorean Archelaus. Despite having so many teachers his undying lust of knowledge lead him to develop his own method of inquiry known as the Socrates method of questioning. ...
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