Character of Socrates.

Character of Socrates. Essay example
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Philosophy
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This paper aims to compare and contrast in essence the problems of Socrates as discovered by Nietzsche, as seen in the court and as revealed in talks with Crito…

Introduction

The paper initially compares, then contrasts and eventually concludes about the character of Socrates. This is done by taking into account what is said by Nietzsche about Socrates’ problems in TI, as Socrates talks with Crito and as seen in Apology. Some of the attributes of Socrates as discovered by Nietzsche are similar to the ones seen in Apology, when Socrates appeared in court and when he talked with one of his friends Crito. There are certain characteristics of Socrates, which did not change, even though his life became quite tough. These include: I. Being argumentative II. His acts of being a real criminal III. Being erotic IV. Being controversial V. Being ironical I. Argumentative Socrates was actually argumentative (Friedrich 33). He began his speech by arguing on how the problem he faced was massive; he stated that his accusers hardly uttered a word of truth about him. He went onto further state that his accusers may go ahead and tell the men of Athens that Socrates deceives people through his eloquence. He also goes onto declare that using the same words is like a known habit to Socrates, since it was seen in the money changer’s table and agora among other places. ...
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