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The Relativist Doctrine - Essay Example

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College
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Philosophy
Pages 5 (1255 words)

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Name: Course: Date: The truth Truth is relative based on ones culture and upbringing. While one thing could be right to one person, a group of people or a certain community, it could be wrong to others. All this is dependent on the culture of a people and on what they believe to be true…

Extract of sample
The Relativist Doctrine

Thus, the moral principle in a person, which determines what they perceive as truth, is based on an individual’s circumstances, culture, parental guidance and upbringing as well as ones opinions (Underwood, 2001). Thus according to this doctrine, there is no law that is obligatory to be upheld and to exercise control over all men. The law is based upon what a society or a group of people could perceive as suitable during a particular time and dependent on the situation. As the society keeps changing, so does the circumstances and the situations, necessitating the change of such laws ones upheld as the standard of control of the society. Thus, the standard of morality is also amenable to change, as the society and the environment changes (Sulloway, 1996). However, though this opinion is upheld by the doctrine, there arises a question as to whether there are some categories of behaviors, which can be universally acclaimed right or wrong. Truth is defined as saying of what is, that it is and what is not, that is not (Sinclair, 1937). Thus, truth refers to the conformity to facts and actualities. Different cultures have different truths, meaning that it is the culture, which determines the truth and not the reverse. Therefore, the variance in different cultures creates the variance in different truth components as perceived by a people (Feynman, 1965). ...
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