The Ethical Views of Socrates found in the Euthyphro and in The Crito

The Ethical Views of Socrates found in the Euthyphro and in The Crito Personal Statement example
College
Personal Statement
Philosophy
Pages 4 (1004 words)
Download 0
Name Institution Date In many situations, the human beings have always wondered concerning an individual's existence and his position in the scheme of things. They have always asked in amazement and curiosity whatever it is all about. How life should be understood, how they are going to live their lives, whether life ends at death…

Introduction

This is a section of philosophy involving systematic defending, and concepts of recommending of the wrong and right behaviour. A reasonable, ethical foundation needs a standard value in which all actions and goals could be compared. In this regard, these standards include an individual’s own life and happiness that makes them able to live (Melchert 5). This is an individual’s ultimate value of standard, the key goal for which an ethical man should always aim. These goals are arrived at through the examination of the nature of man and identifying man's needs that are always peculiar. In most cases, the ethical system consists of emergency situations and daily choices. In this regard, it includes an individual’s relation to other individuals and recognizes their necessity especially into ones physical survival, happiness and wellbeing (Melchert 6). It also identifies that life is an end in itself and that in many situations sacrifice may be destructive despite being necessary. According to the theory of wrong and right, evil and good, it is certain that human beings are more than just believers. Human beings are always known to be doers. The main question comes up concerning the extent of wisdom that may explain how people can live their lives best. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

Crito
Euthyphro identifies with Socrates because people laugh at him when he predicts the future. On the other hand, Euthyphro is accusing his father of murder. His father, by neglect, had let a servant who had killed another servant die in a ditch while awaiting instruction on what to do with him. Socrates taunts Euthyphro if he has such a precise knowledge of right and wrong and if so, whether what he…
Euthyphro by Socrates Assignment
According to “Eutyphro By Plato” (2011), Plato and Euthyphro start talking about piety when Euthyphro brings up the fact that he is prosecuting his father for the murder of a domestic servant who had, in a state of drunkenness, murdered a field worker (par. 33). Plato was mainly concerned about this because he was about to be indicted with impiety. According to “Eutyphro By Plato” (2011),…
Euthyphro
Because their opinions about holiness are at odds, Socrates who is portrayed by Plato as a person who is eager to engage in discourse with the people on Athens asks Euthyphro what his concept of holiness is so he might learn from how Euthyphro defines it. Says Socrates, “Tell me then, what is the pious, and what the impious, do you say?” (5e) Initially, this is how the concept of holiness…
Socrates
Socrates was a Greek philosopher, whereas Cicero was a Roman rhetor. Socrates was born in 469 BC, while Cicero was born in 106 BC, so these philosophers expressed their wisdom in different epochs. They both used dialogues as a narrative and a polemical form to develop the state of mind of their students. Socratic dialogues criticized practices of the society, and it appeared that Socrates…
Socrates
Therefore, he decided to take up his punishment and not attempt to escape. One argument that Socrates used in accepting his punishment was his contention that Athenian laws had a parental authority over the inhabitants of Athens. Sans these laws, Socrates as a man would not have been who he was and would not even have been born. "In the first place did we not bring you into existence? Your father…
Euthyphro : Plato
In the beginning of the work, Socrates is shocked that one could take their father to trial on charges of manslaughter; deeming it to be so far outside the conventions of the law and of society that it is almost incomprehensible morally and/or judicially. Euthyphro, on the other hand, focuses on the piety of the son and courage that he must have had in order to perform such an action; referening…
Socratic religion: Is Socrates irreligious or impious?
Socrates is not irreligious because he categorically states that he actually does believe in some of the same gods that are feted by the state. What Socrates stated that he was against were the stories that were associated with different Greek gods. This is because these tales are not particularly praiseworthy or virtuous in ways that are often associated, in different cultures, with godly…