Explain and assess the role that virtue plays in Aristotle's theory of justice.

Explain and assess the role that virtue plays in Aristotle
Masters
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Philosophy
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Aristotle’s Views on Justice and Virtue Introduction Aristotle, who lived between 384 BC and 322 BC, is still perceived as one of the initiators of the concept of Western democracy. Aristotle stated that justice is a word that can be used to define impartiality or fairness, as injustice describes anarchy and inequality…

Introduction

Aristotle claimed that justice should be dispensed in an appropriate manner. He also believed in the strength of virtue in changing the society. Aristotle's book, ‘Nicomachean Ethics’ explained the theory of virtue. He mentioned two kinds of virtue: the moral variety, and the intellectual variety (Raphael 2003). When Aristotle mentioned the subject of moral virtues, he spoke in reference to a person's character, and the way he conducted himself in his daily life. He stated that an individual’s character is a learned function, and not one that he was born with. Essentially, he felt that virtue was merely the balance between different extremes. The Greek term for "happiness" is pronounced as Eudaimonia, which basically refers to maintaining a pleasant spirit. In Aristotle’s view, the highest objective of man was to maintain joy. Aristotle stressed that the definition of happiness was not merely keeping a happy face on a constant basis, or running after pleasure filled activities so that one can maintain superficial joy. This is how the current society tends to define happiness (Raphael 2003). Happiness and the possession of good morals are factors that are linked, in Aristotle’s view. ...
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