Evangelical and Pentecostal Christianity - Essay Example

Extract of sample
Evangelical and Pentecostal Christianity

In my essay, I am going to do a comparison and contrast essay which is based on evangelical and pentecostal Christianity and how these are mainly focused in a specific region.
In dealing with evangelical and pentecostal Christianity, it is important to examine their similarities especially where they come together in their ideologies. They come together especially in their universality of their teachings and the timelessness ( Wolffe, 2002). They tend to agree with each other in their teachings and philosophies which are inherently tied to each other and are especially predominant when they are dealing with conflict or tension situations where they actually see eye to eye. It is also important to take into account that because we are dealing with these religions, I am using the Wolffe's perspective on a lot of these issues. He suggests that it is predominantly in the developing world that Evangelism and Pentecostal Christianity have their strongest foothold with particular emphasis being placed on Latin America (2002).
In examining the criteria for their comparison, it is noteworthy to mention that Pentecostal religion and Evangelism have similarities in that they are especially geared towards migrants and people from a similar ethnic background-a sort of common background that brings about ethnic groups with similar ideologies together (Wolffe, 2002). ...
Download paper

Summary

In my essay, I am going to do a comparison and contrast essay which is based on evangelical and pentecostal Christianity and how these are mainly focused in a specific region…
Author : kadensimonis
Download 1

Related Essays

Christianity
2. Why were the Romans initially threatened by Christianity? The Romans were initially threatened by Christianity because leaders who stood and believed in the status quo did not encourage any shift of power from one social group to another. In fact, a shift in power would amount to quite big problems; it all boiled down to money. Without enough people to make sacrifices at the temple, people who worked in temples and made money as money changers in the temples did not make money off to Christians, who refused to participate due to the new wave of thinking brought in by Christianity....
11 pages (2761 words) Essay
Christianity: Who, What, When, Where, How
Most Christians, though not all, believe in a triune God, known as The Trinity. This means, according to the Athanasian Creed, that God is one, but is comprised of three aspects, or three manifestations: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit (BookofConcord.org). God the Father was dominant in the Old Testament, and is the presence that walked with Adam and Eve, the One who gave Moses the Ten Commandments (consisting of rules for moral living), the One who entered into covenants with Noah, Abraham and others, and the One who sent Jesus. God the Son is Jesus, the one who taught...
6 pages (1506 words) Research Paper
An Account for the Growth of Evangelical/Pentecostal Christianity in the Regions: UK, USA, Latin America
Latin America was one of the beneficiaries of the out flux of the Welsh revival in the early 19th century. Like in North America, the reception and propagation of the Pentecostal movement in Latin America was also positive. Consequently, this led to the establishment of numerous churches in the region.
...
6 pages (1506 words) Essay
Pentecostalism
Truly, many evangelical and fundamentalist Christians can be very disapproving of Pentecostal doctrine. Regrettably, numerous atheists equate "Christian Privilege" with "fundamentalism" and it is an outcome of customary Methodism. The dualistic principles which most describe Pentecostal churches and distinguish them from other Protestant factions are the conviction in the Baptism of the Holy Spirit in addition the follow-onto charismata (The Gifts of the Spirit are like talking in tongues). The conviction in charismata and Gifts of the Holy Spirit is centred on the book of Acts chapter 2 when...
8 pages (2008 words) Essay
The age of reason and Evangelical Biblical Interpretation
To give substantial foundation of the argument, the proponent also includes basic information about evangelicalism and after this the analysis of how enlightenment affects the way evangelicals interpret the Scripture. Implications and findings are generated from reputable sources about concerning evangelical approaches to biblical hermeneutics. These references are in line with understanding and analysing the prevailing way of biblical interpretation of evangelicalism. It is evident that the age of reason or enlightenment had considerable influence on how to interpret biblical text. First,...
13 pages (3263 words) Essay
Christianity
Paul met Peter and James, a brother of Jesus. Paul was not acquainted with the other apostles. The main differences in Paul's ideas were the following: he did not mention anything about Miracles, Parables, Birth, Mary and Joseph, the Lord's Prayer, etc. Paul did not draw parallels between relations of a man to God's son. Graham Stanton, Professor of New Testament Studies in the University of London, explains Paul's failure as a failure of Jesus' teachings misinterpretation. He says: "Paul's failure to refer more frequently to the actions and teaching of Jesus is 'baffling'" (“What did Paul...
4 pages (1004 words) Coursework
Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!