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Role of Moses in Judaism - Research Paper Example

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Undergraduate
Author : ftoy
Research Paper
Religion and Theology
Pages 9 (2259 words)

Summary

Name: Professor: ROLE OF MOSES IN JUDAISM: In the bible, one of the greatest Israelite’s prophets is Moses and the Jews call him, Moshe Rabbenu, meaning Moses our teacher. Moses was born in Egypt in a period when the Egyptians subjected the Israelites to slavery…

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Role of Moses in Judaism

Still the Israelites, operating under the blessings of God, grew in numbers and stronger (Wheless, 19). This forced the Egyptians to introduce tighter controls against the Israelites by killing their children. It is during this time that Moses is born. This was as a result of the Israelite prayers to God, to deliver them from the Egyptian bondage. To protect Moses from death, her mother places him in a casket and it flows along the River Nile, and through Gods intervention, the Casket flows into the hands of Pharaohs daughter who adopts him as her son and therefore raised as an Egyptian prince. Moses grew up in the palace but he did not identify himself with the Egyptians. As a grown up man, Moses was not happy at the way in which his people were being treated, and he at one time killed an Egyptian for beating up an Israelite, thereby drawing the wrath of Pharaoh and fleeing to Midian and in this land, Moses met Zipporah, and married her. Zipporah was a daughter of Jethro, the priest of Median. Moses worked for him, for forty years as a shepherd, and it is while tending after the flock, that he got a visitation from God, requiring him to go back to Egypt, and to Pharaoh in particular, demanding the release of the Israelites from bondage. ...
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