Constitutional Law Master Essay

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At first sight, this is a strange question. Any constitution would evidently be useless if it did not constrain seriously - under the threat of sanctions- at least the ways and means in which access to power is gained, and the limits of the authority of the principal power holder.


There is no technical difference between ordinary statutes and law considered "constitutional law." Therefore the Parliament of the United Kingdom can perform "constitutional reform" simply by passing Acts of Parliament and thus has the power to change any written or unwritten element of the constitution. The constitution is based on the concept of all sovereignty ultimately belonging to Parliament (Parliamentary sovereignty), so the concept of entrenchment cannot exist. The lack of a central written constitutional document explaining the fundamental principles of the state and relationship between its institutions and between the people leads some constitutionalists to regard the United Kingdom as having "no (formal) constitution." The phrase "unwritten constitution" is sometimes used, despite the fact that the UK constitution incorporates many written sources, statutory law being considered the most important source of the constitution. But the case remains that the constitution relies far more on unwritten constitutional conventions than virtually every other liberal democratic constitution.
Conventions as a source of constitutional rules have been widely acknowledged. Regardless of whether a country possesses an unwritten1 or a written constitution, constitutional conventions usually play an important role in regulating constitutional relationships among different branches of government. ...
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